Friday Foto: Zugspitze, A Child’s View

Zugspitze

So much of my adventure focus in recent years has been about children. As my own two kids grow and form, I’ve tried to spark and encourage their inherent adventurous spirits. It’s a primary reason that I live where I live, in easy touch of mountains and water. Continue reading

Friday Foto: Lake Pukaki

Pukaki2

Lake Pukaki has long been the dream viewpoint in New Zealand’s South Island, peering across glacial waters to Mt Cook, the highest peak in the country. Most people drive here, but it’s now also part of the route for the Alps 2 Ocean cycleway, one of 18 new cycle routes being carved throughout New Zealand. Continue reading

Friday Foto: Mt Amos

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As I write, I’m on Tasmania’s Freycinet Peninsula, researching my umpteenth feature on one of the island’s most famous locations. Wineglass Bay overshadows everything here, with its perfect white curve having become one of the signature scenes not just for Tasmania but also for Australia. Continue reading

Friday Foto: South African Sunset

Karongwe sun

In the South African lowveld, most days seem to end like this, with the fierce sun blooming as red as a poppy in the final minutes before it rolls away below the horizon. At these moments I’m inclined to give momentary thanks for dust haze and pollution…so very bad for the world, but so very good for sunsets. Continue reading

Friday Foto: Bathurst Harbour, Tasmania

Forest Lagoon

In Lonely Planet’s newly published 1000 Ultimate Adventures, Tasmania’s Bathurst Harbour has been named among the world’s 10 ‘epic sea-kayak paddles’. It’s not difficult to see why, in this place that belies numbers. Deep inside the state’s World Heritage-listed Southwest wilderness, it’s little more than 100km from Hobart and yet you feel centuries away. When I kayaked here two summers ago, we paddled for a week and didn’t see another person or boat until the final day – and then it was a barge carrying in a bulldozer to grade the remote airstrip at Melaleuca. Continue reading

Friday Foto: Eliot Falls, Cape York

Eliot Falls

A few years ago I cycled with five friends from Cairns to Cape York, the northern tip of Australia, a three-week journey of around 1200 kilometres across some of the roughest roads in the country. There were days we pushed our bikes as much as we pedalled them, grinding through sand and over corrugations that had ambitions to one day become the Grand Canyon. Continue reading

Crocs, Yaks and Camels: The Joy of the Open Air

In a recent study, researchers at the University of Colorado found that camping has the ability to reset our body clocks. In dragging us away from the electric lights that so disrupt the natural order and cycle of daily life, camping isn’t just good for the soul, it also apparently recalibrates our sleep patterns. Continue reading

Cycling Manali to Leh, India

Between the Indian cities of Manali and Leh, a highway wriggles through the Himalayas. It travels for 500 kilometres, crossing five high passes, including some of the highest road passes in the world. It journeys from the monsoon-washed greenery of Himachal Pradesh to the high, stark desert of Ladakh, passing through terrain so gorgeously brutal that the road is usually open for just three or four months of the year. That time of year is now. Continue reading